Prakriti, Vikruti, and the Ayurvedic Clock

This article is the fourth in a series leading us into the Ayurveda Immersion at Yoga Center of Columbia beginning in January.

Prakriti

Prakriti on the one hand means “Nature, She who is the first creation.” (Svoboda, Prakriti, Your Ayurvedic Constitution, p. 27)  It also refers to your innate physical constitution, your personal metabolic pattern, or in other words your dosha signature.  You may recall kapha, pitta, and vata from our first post.   Your unique constitution depends upon many factors — some of them including genetics, your mother’s health habits during pregnancy, or any abnormal events that may have occurred surrounding your birth.  The amount of each dosha present within you offers the framework for your life experience.  At birth you had certain characteristics that define you, your prakriti, and that tends to not change throughout your lifetime.

There are eight different body constitutions according to ayurveda: kapha, pitta, vata, kapha-pitta, kapha-vata, pitta-vata, vata, and the eighth is much more rare, it is called tridoshic and refers to when kapha-pitta-vata are all of equal amounts.  Everyone has one or more doshas predominant at the time of birth, but as life unfolds, it is possible and even likely that one or more of the doshas will go out of balance.  In other words there may be accumulations or deficiencies of the different qualities.

A common misunderstanding is that when we attempt to bring ourselves back into balance, that means we want to maintain kapha, pitta, and vata in equal amounts within the body-mind structure.  This is not true.  Balance means that kapha, pitta, and vata are restored to your unique prakritic level.

Vikruti

There are many tests you may take to determine your constitution.  You may find examples here and here.  But the question really is, what is currently out of balance within me?  The current state of your health is your Vikruti.  You may be a Pitta-Vata but lately you have been incredibly hangry and have no patience with your family.  Sounds like your pitta is a little excessive.  To restore balance, remember the principle of “like increases like and opposites balance,” and you might want to take up swimming for example, an activity that has a cooling quality.  You might add more cooling foods and herbs to your diet like melons, cucumber, or cilantro.  Or, you may be a straight-up Vata, but you have a lot of congestion in your sinuses and lungs.  In that case, Kapha is out of balance and so you might choose to add more warming foods and spices like cayenne pepper to your diet to help decrease the excess earthy-watery mucous.

Ayurveda suggests gentle ways to deal with imbalances before they get out of control and turn in to disease.  Changing foods or exercise habits to meet your needs are excellent places to begin.  There are many ways to look at vikruti, a current imbalance, and to restore your doshas back to your prakritic level.  This is a longer discussion, no doubt.

Doshas may be in or out of balance based on other factors too.  The time of day, the season of the year, the stage of life, all of these have an effect on the doshas as well.

Ayurvedic Clock

In Ayurveda, 10, 2, and 6 are important transitions to the day, AM or PM.  6 0’clock is a little more fluid, one might refer to that time as sunrise or sunset instead.  From 6am (sunrise) to 10am and also 6pm (sunset) to 10pm, the elements of earth and water, Kapha dosha, are predominant.  This is the time of the day that we might feel more loving, more grounded, or more sleepy for example.  It is a good idea to get to bed by 10pm to ride the coattails of Kapha’s sleepiness into a delightful slumber.

10am to 2pm and 10pm to 2am are fire and water predominant, Pitta dosha.  Therefore, lunchtime is ideal for your biggest meal of the day, when the outer fire, the sun shines brightest, our inner fire is most ready to digest the foods we eat.  This might also account for the desire for a midnight snack.  However, at night when we are sleeping is really the best time to digest not only excess food already consumed previously during the day but also our daily sense impressions, so better to be sleeping from 10pm to 2am.  Says your mother.  In a loving way.

2am to 6am and 2pm to 6pm are air and space predominant, related to Vata dosha.  This is a lighter, drier, more mobile time of the day.  It is also a more subtle time.  In the morning before or around sunrise is an excellent time for meditation or spiritual practice.  Likewise at sunset.  If you can at least arise out of bed by sunrise, quite often you’ll notice a “spring in your step” or just a sense of being awake and alert in a calm manner, as opposed to when you sleep in until the kapha time of day and then the rest of the day you feel logy and sluggish.  Says your mother.  In a loving way.  But there is a reason for it, see?

The seasons also correspond to the doshas.  In Ayurveda, we think of the year as containing three seasons.  Kapha occurs in late winter and early spring when it is cold and wet outside.  Pitta is related to summer, no question; and Vata is related to autumn and early winter when things are drying out and turning cool again.  So you might be a Pitta who gets acid indigestion, but in winter a few hotter, spicier foods may be available to you without discomfort.  You might be a Kapha, but in summertime when it is hot outside, having some ice cream may be good for you.

Time of life corresponds to the doshas as well.  From birth to puberty, Kapha is predominant.  Think of how babies are chubby and full of love.  At puberty, a bit of hormonal fire kicks in and Pitta arises. From the teen years to middle age is when we study hard, find a fulfilling career, and start a family.  These are all very active, busy activities.  Pitta is the one who is motivated to get things done.  Middle age to end of life is associated with Vata.  In Ayurveda there is a saying that the process of aging is the process of drying out.  This is why there are so many practices that involve oils.  Sesame oil swishing in the mouth, self-massage with a doshic balancing oil, or even shirodhara, the process of dripping warm oil on the eyebrow center for relaxation and purification.  Oil counters the drying out and keeps one looking young and beautiful.  (with radiant skin!)  😉

So when we talk about Ayurveda being the study of aligning with Nature’s rhythms, these are some ways to be aware of Her rhythm.  This is a long and complex discussion, but I think a fun one because it opens up so many possibilities for self care.  To me, it is extremely fulfilling to flow with the rhythm of Nature, and in studying Ayurveda we learn how to do that.  When you feel balanced and healthy, you make the world a more balanced and healthy place.  We all owe that to ourselves!!!

In my upcoming Ayurveda Immersion, co-taught with Debbie Martin at the Yoga Center of Columbia, we will go into more detail on nature’s rhythms, prakriti, vikruti, and the ayurvedic clock.  The Immersion is a great way to learn in community with others; the conversations will be interesting and stimulating, and the community support will help you to change unwanted habits for the better.  If you would like to learn more, I hope you will join us!

Agni and Ama

This article is the third in a series leading us into the Ayurveda Immersion at Yoga Center of Columbia beginning in January.

If the subtle essences of prana, tejas, and ojas are the reward for living a healthy lifestyle, just how do we increase these qualities in our lives?

AGNI  

“It is the inextinguishable flame, the witness behind all our states of consciousness, the ever-wakeful seer.” (Frawley, Yoga and Ayurveda, p.105-6)

While there are specific ways to encourage more prana, tejas, and ojas, it all comes down to fire.  Agni in Sanskrit means fire, and Hinduism deifies Agni into an anthropomorphic form because they consider it that important.  Fire metabolizes, fire changes, fire transforms.  It is the transforming force of the universe.  It is not simply fire as we know it, but fire with all of its potential — heat, light, electricity.

The yogis tell us that this divine fire is the origin of all life and the impulse to love.  They say it is the “power of the soul that motivates us from within.” (Frawley, Yoga and Ayurveda, p.105)  Without fire there would be no warmth to cook our food nor warmth with which to hug and offer love.  According to Ayurveda, there are over 40 different types of fire in the body.  A few examples would be the digestive fire that transforms food into nutrients; the fire of awareness that helps us understand the difference between what is real and meaningful and what is not; the fire that affects body heat and fever when we are fighting off illness; there is even an agni representing cellular metabolism and functioning.

Cue the happy music:  Agni is the force necessary for evolution to occur.  This concept of fire in Ayurveda represents how the elements combine and convert into doshas which are refined into the subtle essences.  The yogis advise us to cultivate balanced agni whenever and wherever possible.

Types of Agni Related to Digestion

Jatharagni is located in the stomach and duodenum.  This is the one responsible for digestion.  There are four types:

  1. Samagni – a balanced digestive fire; this is the ideal, when food is digested and absorbed well; one will have a good appetite for nutritious food and very little gas, colic, or constipation
  2. Tikshnagni – sharp or excessive digestive fire; in this case one may develop heart burn, diarrhea, or a host of other things involved with hyperacidity of the stomach
  3. Mandagni – weak digestive fire; one may have a poor appetite, feel sluggish, or have a tendency toward weight gain
  4. Vishamagni – variable digestive fire; there are alternating cycles of strong appetite and loss of appetite; one may be affected by gas, constipation, diarrhea, or a host of other things

We can use food, herbs, and spices to help regulate jatharagni.  If one has a predominantly earth-water constitution of Kapha, Ayurveda suggests this person eat lighter drier foods like leafy greens and hotter spices like ginger or cayenne pepper to balance that.  If one has the predominantly fire-water constitution of Pitta, she should consume more cooling foods like cucumbers, sweet melons, cilantro, or turmeric.  Likewise if one has a predominantly air-space constitution of Vata, then he would favor foods with more earth element in them like root vegetables, avocado, or coconut.  The principle of “opposites balance” is at play here.

When agni is balanced, one will experience nourishment, proper energy level, contentment, regular elimination, strong immunity, a clear radiant complexion, excellent circulation, and overall strength and vitality.  Who would not want to cultivate proper agni?

But, what happens if agni is weak and food is not digested properly?

AMA

Cue the scary music here:  Ama is the Sanskrit word for undigested food, sense impressions, thoughts, and actions; it is a toxic, sticky sludge that forms in the body and creates cloudiness, confusion, and excess weight.  Ama can lead to fatigue and a feeling of heaviness.  It may induce indigestion, bad breath, gas, diarrhea, constipation, and mental confusion.  When ama is present, one might experience excessive mucous production, clammy skin, loss of appetite, hypertension, diabetes, or obesity.

So, it really does pay to support agni because agni is the fire that burns away impurities; it helps rid the body of ama or excess gunk.  It enhances our experience of the subtle essences of prana, tejas, and ojas which we now know creates the experiences of creativity, inner radiance, peacefulness, contentment, and joy.  Balanced agni is our friend in good health.  Cue the fireworks!

In my upcoming Ayurveda Immersion, co-taught with Debbie Martin at the Yoga Center of Columbia, we will go into more detail on how to cultivate agni and reduce ama.  The Immersion is a great way to learn in community with others; the conversations will be interesting and stimulating, and the community support will help you to change unwanted habits for the better.  If you would like to learn more, I hope you will join us!

The Subtle Essences

This article is the second in a series leading us into the Ayurveda Immersion at Yoga Center of Columbia beginning in January.

Last week we talked about the three doshas or body constitutions, the six tastes known as sat rasa, and the principle of how “like increases like and opposites balance each other.”  This week we will discuss what happens when the body-mind structure is in balance.

According to ayurveda, there are three subtle essences that arise within the body from the doshas.

Ojas

Kapha is the constitution related to water and earth.  When kapha is out of balance, one may feel heaviness, sadness, or depression; one may be sluggish, lethargic or carry excess weight.  When kapha is in balance, a person feels love and compassion for oneself and the world, she feels at peace and in harmony with herself and those around her.  Ojas arises.

Ojas is the first of the subtle essences.  Ojas is the lubricating part of the body that nourishes all of the tissues, such as blood, lymph, muscles, and bones.  It is the stuff responsible for a strong immune system, vigor, longevity, and overall well being of an individual.  We cannot have ojas without balanced kapha dosha.  When ojas is present, one has a radiant complexion, youthfulness, cheerfulness, a high threshold for stress, and mental clarity.  If ojas is weak or low, one may be timid, insecure, have poor appetite, or have feelings of worthlessness.

A few ways to protect ojas would be to eat a balanced meal which, according to ayurveda, contains all of the six tastes as discussed last week.  Do not rush your meal or eat on the go in the car or on the run.  In other words, sit and enjoy your meal, taste your food and keep good company when you eat.  Nourishing your mind through meditation or quiet walks in nature also protects and increases ojas.  There are more ways to support ojas, but this is a good start.

Tejas

Tejas is the second of the subtle essences.  Tejas is the inner radiance that shines in the luster of one’s eyes and the glow of one’s skin.  Tejas brings clarity to the mind, will-power, courage and fearlessness to one’s demeanor.  It is a type of fire that transforms food into nutrients the body can use and it transforms sensory experiences into knowledge and even wisdom.   One cannot have tejas without balanced pitta dosha.

Pitta dosha is the constitution related to fire and secondarily water.  When pitta is out of balance, one may feel sharp emotions like anger, jealousy, irritation, frustration.  In the extreme, pitta becomes the “type A” personality.  When pitta is in balance, one has energy to accomplish things, one has a healthy sense of competition, and there is a warmth to one’s personality that is highly attractive.

Keeping pitta in balance will stoke the subtle fire of tejas in a healthy way.  Avoid excessive talking about menial things or gossip to strengthen tejas.  A regular meditation practice or even chanting mantras will keep the inner radiance shining brightly.  Long slow deep breathing and mindful awareness are also helpful.

Prana

The third of the vital essences arises from Vata dosha.  It is known as prana.  Vata dosha forms from the elements of air and space so a person with a vata dominant constitution will have qualities of lightness, mobility, tendency toward dryness, and plenty of creativity.  Vata dosha is the primary biological force because it is the one that creates and supports movement.  Without movement of any fashion there is no life.  The key to managing all doshas and subtle essences is to care for vata.

When vata is out of balance, one may feel mentally scattered or ungrounded; one may be anxious, nervous, or fearful; and one’s behavior may be erratic.  When vata is in balance, one is creative and open-minded; one is a powerful speaker with an enthusiastic personality and the ability to understand a broad range of topics quickly.  When vata is in balance, prana is unblocked and flows freely.

Prana moves in five directions in the body: downward and inward like an inhalation, downward and outward like an exhalation, metabolizing or support during transformation, upward and outward as in speech, and circulating throughout the entire body-mind structure.  When prana is unblocked and flows freely, one has abundant vitality and is a source of inspiration.

A few suggestions to keep vata in balance are to keep a regular schedule for your daily routine: wake at the same time every day, eat meals at the same time, and go to bed at the same time every day.  This sets up a rhythm for life so one’s body-mind knows what to expect and even prepares for food or sleep so that one may gain more nourishment from those experiences.  Turning off all electronics, including television and phone, one hour before bedtime to have a more sound sleep is another way; one could use that time for reading, quiet contemplation, or meditation.  Third but not lastly, increasing one’s intake of root vegetables in the diet may have a grounding, soothing effect on one’s system to help balance vata.

Conclusion

So you can see that cultivating the subtle essences can be a very positive force in one’s life.  Ayurveda practice offers techniques to enhance ojas, tejas, and prana to restore balance in one’s life but also to live life fully and to thrive.

In my upcoming Ayurveda Immersion, co-taught with Debbie Martin at the Yoga Center of Columbia, we will go into more detail on how to cultivate the subtle essences.  The Immersion is a great way to learn in community with others; the conversations will be interesting and stimulating, and the community support will help you to change unwanted habits for the better.  If you would like to learn more, I hope you will join us!

 

Why Study Ayurveda?

This article is the first in a series leading us into the Ayurveda Immersion at Yoga Center of Columbia beginning in January.

The word Ayurveda means the knowledge of life.  Ayur means life or vital power, and Veda means knowledge or science.  It offers a way of approaching life that encourages good health and well-being.  I think of it as a handbook for living well.  Ayurveda is considered a sister-practice of yoga because they both developed around the same time, several thousand years ago, in the same place, India.  Yoga and other meditative practices are a part of Ayurveda, and there is so much more.

So, how does it work?  In Ayurveda, one tries to align oneself with the rhythms of nature, and nature consists of five basic elements: earth, water, fire, air, and space.  These elements are the stuff of the universe and therefore are within our own bodies as well as in animals, plants, and everything we experience in life.  Our senses perceive these elements in different forms, we smell the earth, we taste with liquids, we feel warmth, we see color, and we hear vibration.  Ayurveda wants to find balance in all that we perceive, think, and do.

If all things are made of these five elements, then so are our bodies.  Earth represents the density of our bones, and any physical tangible part of us that we can see, touch, and smell.  Water is in the fluids of our bodies, blood, lymph, saliva, sexual fluid, gastric juices.  Fire is found in body heat, and in the act of processing and digestion.  Gastric juices are fluid but they also contain acids which are a type of fire that help us digest food.  There are many types of fire, called agni, within the body, and each one is responsible for some type of processing or transformation.  Think: once we take in some kind of sensory information, then we have to make sense of it, the making sense is the processing.  Of course we breathe air and it provides vital life force for us to live — one can go weeks without food, days without water, but only minutes without air.  And space is more ephemeral, it is more difficult to recognize, but space exists, and if we did not have space we would not be here.

In our bodies, these five elements dance together in different ways and each of us has one or two predominant elements that provide our constitutional make-up.  There are three main constitutions that arise and they may combine in seven different ways to describe one’s particular essence and predilections.  The three main constitutions are known as doshas.  Dosha literally translates as “that which darkens,” or even “defect,” but this is referring specifically to the qualifying of the infinite, universal stuff that according to yoga is our True Nature.  So, we all come from this infinite, expansive, universal consciousness, but Consciousness, or Light, chooses to embody, and it does so through the elements, appearing in the manifest world by way of the doshas, that which darkens the Infinite Light, so to speak.  Here they are:

Kapha (kahp’-ha) – predominantly water and earth; kapha is nourishing, soft, related to the emotion of love, and a kapha person is someone you want to hug; some of its qualities include heaviness, coldness, tenderness, and slowness

Pitta (pit’-ta) – predominantly fire and water; pitta is a driving force that makes us competitive and compels us to do more, a pitta person gets things done; pitta metabolizes, and some of its qualities include hotness, moistness, sharpness, and of a spreading nature

Vata (vah’-tah) – predominantly air and space elements; vata is highly mobile, all movement in the body is because of vata, creativity is associated with this dosha; some of its qualities include dryness, lightness, coldness, and volatility

There are also subtle essences of these doshas.  When a person is in balance, a more subtle form of these qualities or doshas arise, and that is typically when one feels healthy, vital, and connected to others in community.  Stay tuned for another blog post on the subtle essences.

Life is centrifugal – as we live and grow, things tend to expand and change, nothing stays the same.  We gain more life experiences and therefore (hopefully) we gain wisdom.  Inevitably, life circumstances will pull us out of balance.  Ayurveda looks at the five elements and how they are found in nature and offers ways to maintain balance within your own constitution.  One of the ways it does this is by identifying six tastes.  I will list them here:

Sweet – made of earth and water; builds bodily tissues; examples include of course sugar and honey, but sweet taste is also found in butter, cream, grains like wheat and rice, some beans and fruits like mangos or bananas

Salty – made of water and fire; builds bodily tissues; examples will include salt itself, sea salt, rock salt, and also sea vegetables like seaweed and kelp; foods like nuts, chips, and pickles have plenty of salt added to them also

Sour – made of earth and fire; builds bodily tissues; sour taste is found in citrus fruits like lemon and lime; sour milk products like yogurt, cheese, and sour cream; and fermented foods like sauerkraut, vinegar, wine, and soy sauce

Bitter – made of air and space; depletes bodily tissues; examples of foods with bitter taste are leafy green vegetables like kale, spinach, and cabbage; herbs and spices like turmeric, fenugreek, and dandelion root; and coffee

Pungent – made of air and fire; depletes bodily tissues; pungent taste makes food spicy — garlic, onion, and chili peppers for example and also spices like black pepper, ginger, and cumin

Astringent – made of earth and air; depletes bodily tissues; this taste is more difficult to discern, but think of kidney, black, or navy beans, or lentils; vegetables like artichoke, broccoli, cauliflower, and turnips; and grains like rye or quinoa

So the principle in Ayurveda is that “Like increases like and opposites balance each other.”  When you have too much fire element within you, which might manifest as heartburn, then back off of the fiery tastes.  Eat more cooling foods like sweet juicy melon or leafy green vegetables.  If you feel too ungrounded or your mind is spacey or racing, eat more root vegetables.  This is an over-simplification but the examples do hold.

We can work with foods, herbs, and spices in Ayurveda to restore balance, but there are other daily practices that also help to bring equanimity too.  In my upcoming Ayurveda Immersion, co-taught with Debbie Martin at the Yoga Center of Columbia, we will go into more detail on many of these practices.  The Immersion is a great way to learn in community with others; the conversations will be interesting and stimulating, and the community support will help you to change unwanted habits for the better.  If you would like to learn more, I hope you will join us!

Provence Yoga Retreat 2018

This year, we stayed in a wine village in the south of France, Saint Christol.  Our residence used to be a home for nuns.  It is a stunning Clos, walled home or cloistered home, with salt water pool and tennis court.  Like last year, we had to move the furniture out of the living-dining area in order to make way for yoga.

Each morning we had meditation before breakfast.  The boulangerie was a block away, walkable, so we had the freshest croissants possible.  Rita also treated us to plum compote and fresh goat cheese.  Ah, the French.  Then, we had yoga class each morning focusing on the different elements within nature: earth, water, fire, air, and space.  The final day of our retreat was the UN International Day of Peace so we had a partner yoga class to foster community support and offered our “Om”s so that Peace May Prevail On Earth.

Afternoon yoga classes were more restorative with forward bends, twists, and yoga nidra because most days after yoga we were out exploring somewhere.  Annette chose amazing places for us to visit.  Below are some photos from our trip.

Morning Yogis at Clos Saint Christol
Il est interdit d’ interdir: It is prohibited to prohibit. I.e. no censorship! at the first local brewery in Saint Christol
Yogis enjoying some wine
Plums!
Horses and bulls get along in Camargue.
Camargue horses
Saintes Maires de la Mer fishing boats
Aigues Mortes salt harvest
Aigues Mortes castle
Flamingoes in Aigues Mortes
Beep beep!
Saint Paul Asylum, Saint Rémy garden
Van Gogh’s bedroom in Saint Paul Asylum, Saint Rémy
Abbey de Frigolet window
Yogis at Abbey de Frigolet!
Phyllis and Rose in partner Tree Pose
Daria and Linda wishing you Peace
Some of our group in Warrior III on UN International Day of Peace
Sète harbor and lighthouse

Amazing Things About South India: Part 1

I went to South India with my teacher, Douglas Brooks, and an intrepid group of 22 other travelers.  We flew into Chennai and visited Thirupathi, Thirutani, Kanchipuram, Thiruvannamalai, Chidambaram, Kumbakonam, Thiruchendur, and Madurai.  It was a whirlwind trip both geographically and internally. There were so many amazing and incredible experiences that I would like to recount, so this five part series is my attempt to do just that.

Part 1: The South Indian People

These folks win the prize for resilience. It is their “winter” season and the temps were in the 80s and close to 90 everyday. A “three shower day” I call it. It is a harsh climate, especially without air conditioning. And if you have air conditioning, you are not always guaranteed that the electrical grid will hold up throughout the day. It is challenging, and yet, I saw so many smiles on people’s faces.

Their homes come in many shapes and styles, but we visited one village, where our tour guide Babu has a small farm. We first stopped at a traditional potter’s home. He was spinning pots on his porch, where the roof made of bamboo and thatch hung low. So low in fact that one of our travelers hit her head on the bamboo post sticking out. It was bloody. Everyday they have to duck to get into their home. It is low for a reason though — to keep the sun out.

At this same village we visited a small outdoor temple. Douglas advised that most of the goddess deities we saw here are related to the monsoon and even small pox, the things one has to deal with in this climate in order to survive. Even in this small village, it is clear the villagers take pride in their place, the artwork and attention to detail is amazing.

We visited Babu’s farm after that. He also allows his home to be used as a school for the village children. He told us that when the children first started meeting visitors like us they were so shy, if they said anything they might ask your name, but now they are friendly and open and asking how we are doing. We offered the girls bindis, nail polish, and hair ties. The boys were all about the pens.

In Babu’s home some villagers served us a traditional South Indian lunch. Thali meal. This consists of rice placed in the center of a large banana leaf (yes, literally a banana leaf) with a variety of curries spread around the rice. You mix the curry into the rice with your hands and eat with your fingers. There is no silverware anywhere. The tamarind curry is truly dee-lish.

Our group wanted to be respectful of the culture and so we would wear saris — it took the ladies hours to get ready in the morning. Guys get to wear dhotis, which is basically a big sheet wrapped around your private area. 15 minutes tops to get ready for them. It was so worth it to dress the part. When South Indians would see us in traditional dress, they would be so happy and want to talk and take our photographs. It was interesting to me how, seeing Westerners dressed in traditional South Indian fashion, they weren’t repulsed by cultural appropriation, on the contrary, they were so happy that we were trying to “fit in” as it were that they printed a photo in the newspaper. It was a Tamil language newspaper that Babu and Douglas translated to say basically, ‘look at these Westerners going to temple in traditional Indian clothing, doing their best to follow the tradition and temple rituals, they might help inspire our young people to do the same.’ I am paraphrasing, for sure.

One temple that I really loved was the Murugan Temple in Tiruchendur. This is right on the Bay of Bengal. I think perhaps the laid back beach vibe might be a universal experience. Many people would go to the temple, have darshan, which means to see the deity and be seen by the deity, and then walk outside and take a dip in the sea. The people we met here seemed especially joyful and happy to see us. There were Shakti pilgrims dressed in red saris, and Ayappa pilgrims in black dhotis. Once, after some of our group had darshan, a few of us were waiting in the hallway for the rest of our group. We were standing in front of other shrines where a continuous stream of people were rolling by. One of the Ayappa pilgrims spoke to one of our male travelers within my earshot. As I was listening, he was saying that they are so pleased to see us at the Murugan Temple. It was not just his words but the whole gestalt of smelling the incense burning, the heat of the day, the darkness inside the temple, the sacred air we were breathing… as this pilgrim was speaking, my heart was bursting. It felt as though some hard outer shell was crumbling and an even greater love was beginning to shine through my own chest. It felt like a deeper connection to my own soul. It felt like a merging of different layers of my awareness so that I became more complete as myself. I wanted to hug everyone, but in that moment I just kept breathing deeply and feeling even more deeply. It was enough to just be there.

Saundarya Days in Costa Rica

CR butterfly

“Days of Beauty” in Costa Rica

with Kelly Fisher, E-RYT 500

Panacea de la Montaña
March 11-15, 2015

Enjoy a five-day getaway to beautiful, natural, wild, scenic Costa Rica. Panacea de la Montaña is located on the northwest coast less than a mile from the Pacific Ocean and features breathtaking views of both the ocean and the spectacular mountains. It is the perfect spot to relax, rejuvenate, and go deeper into your yoga practice. Accommodations include your own cabina with large covered porch and hammock, three meals a day prepared from fresh and local ingredients, an infinity pool, and semi-private yoga classes. This retreat is limited to 10 participants, so each yoga class offers an intimate gathering with much more personal time with Kelly. It will be a great time to ask questions regarding your yoga practice and receive more personalized instruction. There is also plenty of free time for you to explore your surroundings. Nature walks, turtle-watching, paddle boarding, surfing, snorkeling, diving, and zip-lining the tree canopy are all within your grasp.

Need an excuse to take a yoga vacation? Read this NYT Op-Ed piece.

This retreat is FULL, but you may register to be on the Wait List.

Sample Daily Schedule:
6:30-7:00am: Meditation
7:00-8:30am: Yoga Class
8:30-9:30am: Breakfast
9:30-12:30pm: Free Time – spend the day participating in the things that you want to do on your vacation, whether enjoying local adventures like scuba, snorkeling, surfing, zip-lining or cultural activities, getting a massage, catching up on reading, or just hanging out.
12:30-1:30pm: Lunch
1:30-5:00pm: Free Time – anything you choose.
5:00-6:30: Yoga Class
6:30-7:30pm: Dinner
8:00: Evening Activity, may include yoga nidra, music, or bonfire
CR Poor Man's Umbrella

Your Stay Includes:
three meals per day (except Saturday night dinner)
daily meditation
twice daily yoga classes
one reflexology session (other services available at additional cost)
shuttle to local beaches
yoga nidra
Saturday evening sailboat outing on the Antares

Panacea offers:
Infinity swimming pool with waterfall
open air rancho for yoga and meditation classes
spa services like massage, aromatherapy, reflexology, facials, and mud treatments
labyrinth and nature walks
fresh, locally grown, organic meals

Other activities you may choose:
(some may have a separate fee)
zip line through the tree canopy
horseback ride on the beach
tour the estuaries, volcanoes, waterfalls
kayak, surf, snorkel, dive
turtle watch
golf
paddle board
white water raft

CR VolcanoAccommodations:
Panacea de la Montana offers bungalow-style cabinas in the simple and comfortable Costa Rican style. Your cabina is double occupancy and is tucked into the mountain, surrounded by native Guanacaste woods and tropical foliage. You will feel at home with nature. Each cabina is furnished with single and/or double beds plus a complete indoor bathroom and full shower.

Travel:
Panacea de la Montaña is located about five miles from Tamarindo, right off the Pacific coast on the Guanacaste Peninsula in northwest Costa Rica.

Please book your own flight. Tamarindo is a short 1 hour drive from the Liberia airport (LIR), or a 4-5 hour drive from SJO Airport. You may also take a domestic flight from SJO to Tamarindo. Check in is from 12 – 5 pm, so please plan your trip accordingly.

Please note that Costa Rica imposes an airport departure tax, currently $29USD. Please go to US government travel website for up-to-date fee.

Rate:
$995 per person, double occupancy, if registered by November 1. ($1195 after Nov 1.)
$500 deposit due upon registration; final payment of $495 (or $695 if registered after Nov 1) due by Jan 15, 2015.

This retreat is FULL, but you may register to be on the Wait List.

All-inclusive: comfortable and scenic accommodations; three fresh, healthy, organic meals per day; sunset sailboat cruise Saturday evening; all yoga, meditation, and yoga nidra classes; plus one reflexology treatment at Panacea’s spa.

What’s not included:
*Shuttle fee from Liberia Airport to Tamarindo, (approximately $65 for 1-2 people, $25 per person for three people, $20 per person for four or more people… I will be happy to help coordinate this with your flights.)
*Any gratuities for services rendered.
*Any special day-adventures you plan on your own. These can be coordinated through me or Panacea if you choose.
*Costa Rica departure tax, currently $29USD.

What to Bring:
passport
your own yoga mat (optional)
your own journal to integrate life’s lessons
one set of nicer clothing for dinner in town or other nightlife activities
sturdy shoes for hiking
sunglasses, hat, sunscreen, beach towel, sandals, umbrella or poncho, insect repellent, sweater, flashlight

Refunds:
I hope you will not have to cancel at all, but if something comes up, your deposit is fully refundable minus a $50 administrative fee until November 1, 2014. After that date, the deposit is fully refundable (minus $50 administrative fee) as long as your space is filled by someone else.

_____
Return to Mamacita Costa Rica.
Move ahead to Trust and the Holy Science.

Summer Solstice One Day Retreat

Saturday, June 21, 9:00am-4:30pm
Blueberry Gardens Wellness Center

Kelly-9083_2This one day getaway is designed for you to be able to step out of your everyday routine to gain some perspective for yourself. Yoga and its accompanying practices of meditation, yoga nidra, chanting, and healthy eating assist you in letting go of patterns in your life that are constricting. Then you become able to make space for yourself to be the creative, loving person you already are but for which you might not always have time. It is not just living, it is thriving. This year, before the long sultry dog days of summer settle in, give yourself the gift of peace and contentment. When you nourish yourself, your friends and family, your community, even the planet will benefit. Celebrate the summer solstice with Certified Holistic Health Coach and vegan chef Ingrid Benecke and Kelly Fisher, E-RYT 500, of Wildflower Yoga on this one day wellness retreat at Blueberry Gardens.

Register online now! $120 if registered by May 18 includes delicious, fresh and local lunch. ($140 if registered after May 18)

Schedule
9:00–9:45am Introductions, tea or raw juice
9:45–11:15am Asana class with Kelly — flow, standing poses, and backbends
11:15–12:00pm Yoga nidra — deep guided relaxation Vegetarian lunch
12:00–1:00pm Lunch
1:00–1:45pm Discussion on food and nutrition with Ingrid
1:45–2:30pm Mauna vrata — conscious silence
2:30-3:00pm Kirtan, chanting
3:00-4:00pm Asana class with Kelly — seated poses and forward bends
4:00-4:30pm Meditation and Closing

What to Wear and Bring
Wear comfortable yoga clothes and bring your sticky mat. The studio has props available but feel free to bring your own if you prefer. Please bring your journal and something to write with. To avoid unnecessary waste, please bring reusable eating utensils and a cloth napkin.

Yoga Indulgence 2013

Lucy Lomax, E-RYT-500, and I are pleased to announce that our fall yoga retreat, Yoga Indulgence, at Kent Manor Inn on the eastern shore is now SOLD OUT! This will be our fifth year on Kent Island and we are looking forward to seeing those of you who registered there. As always, there will be plenty of yoga classes as well as yoga nidra, meditation, and kirtan plus free time to walk, kayak, bike ride, sit quietly — whatever you choose. The retreat is all-inclusive. Chef at KMI is always accommodating to any kind of dietary need and the food is always delicious! Please see our brochure below and put your name on the waiting list in case of a cancelation.

YI2013brochureOutsideSmall
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Next up: Namaste Floyd Yoga Jam 2013.
Return to: Mantra Wisdom.

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